Avoid your ’emotional tipping point’
Avoid your 'emotional tipping point'

Avoid your ’emotional tipping point’

1 month ago 0 0 71

Summary: We all have ’emotional tipping points’ where we shift from a specific issue to having a globalised ‘problem’. Everyone’s tipping point and how they get there is entirely unique. There is a lot we can do to improve our lives by managing our ‘tipping points’ and how we allow things to build up to them. Emotional tipping points: How do you determine how much time you have to spend worrying about things that haven’t happened before you allow yourself to tip over into anxiety? How many times or how strongly must your borders be crossed before you kick off a full blown bout of anger or rage? How many times do you have to feel sad before you allow yourself to tip over into calling yourself depressed? If we want to break the cycle of emotions leading to powerful and unhelpful feelings and labels beyond the tipping point there

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Plan to fail - don't fail to plan

Plan to fail – don’t fail to plan

2 months ago 0 0 47

“Plans are worthless, but planning is everything” (D Eisenhower). Planning is such a critical part of success – but plans are not.  How many times are plans made and simply forgotten?  How many times do people and organisations spend massive time and effort generating a ‘plan’ only for it to be completely out of date before the ink is dry? We are living through such a reality now – As we go through the uncertainties of COVID, organisations and individuals are describing how they have had to ‘pivot’ and ‘adapt’ – meaning that whatever that they had planned to do has been made obsolete.  If plans are worthless, why should we plan? Lesson 1: The future is uncertain “No plan survives the first engagement with the opposition main force” (Helmuth von Moltke, 1871). We cannot forecast the future with any certainty.  We cannot know – or control – what is

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Decision making: the games we play

Decision making: the games we play

2 months ago 0 0 30

This post is part of the series on decision making.  Building on the research around the factors of decision making open to influence, we explore 3 common decision scenarios (games as defined by Nash) and how you can improve your personal decision making. Scenarios for decisions: Consider the following situations: You win at the casino, and believe you have discovered a ‘method’ for winning every time you play. A relative passes away, and there is disagreement over the division of the estate, and the relationships are permanently damaged. You have a rival who would rather harm your chances more than get any benefit, as long as they do better than you they are happy to wear some pain, too. You are in a negotiation and you the other side is asking for and expecting impossible things from you, ensuring the negotiation goes nowhere even though the path seems obvious to

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Running the Hamster Wheel – to disruption

5 months ago 0 0 187

Are you stuck in the hamster wheel- working in the problem rather than on it?   have been presenting to and talking with a lot of senior executives since we have come out of COVID lockdown, and a common theme (which extends to many CEOs I speak to in other settings) is that they are stuck in the ‘Hamster Wheel’ of their business. That is, they have been drawn into working so deeply in the business as they try to navigate the current environment, they have no capacity to focus on much else. The upside of this is that there may be a need for ‘all hands on deck’ to get through and stabilise the business, or in other cases to really take advantage of immediate opportunities. The downside is that no one waits for you to get better, and the ability to work ON your business is diminished as you

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Is your success good enough to last?

5 months ago 0 0 153

Summary: Being successful does not guarantee future success. Human biases impact how we research business success Success can breed ‘expectation’, rather than encouraging staying attuned to your customer Change happens, how are you going to adapt to stay relevant, valuable and fit to serve your customers at their new normal? Research in the 20th century focused on what makes a successful company ‘great’?  Business luminaries like Tom Peters and Jim Collins became ‘gurus’ of the business world by applying research to this exact question. The belief was that the things that make a great company can be distilled from examples of companies that have been successful. This led to a range of ‘business principles’ (like the hedgehog concept from Jim Collins) that became the fads of the late twentieth century management ethos. Years after the initial publications of these works, there was almost a sense of ‘glee’ from parts of

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Don’t waste your change efforts!

5 months ago 0 0 158

Any change requires effort Too much change often leads to change fatigue To drive meaningful and lasting change, efforts around learning and acting both have to occur Ensure that both ‘efforts’ are included to avoid wasted (and failed) change efforts   Personal or corporate change is always seen as ‘hard’.  It doesn’t have to be difficult, but it always will require effort to break out of the current status quo, experiment with new behaviours, and then practice them consistently to make them the new norm. When we go through rapid change, these efforts can be taxing.  Change fatigue often happens when the pace of change is too great and people don’t have the bandwidth or resources to invest the efforts into change processes. Deciding which changes that you face are important and necessary can be a great way to bring your focus and effort on the changes that you want

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Back to office or back to the future?

7 months ago 0 0 328

Summary: Return to workplace scenarios following COVID are loaded with challenges. Staff have new expectations, experiences and capabilities after being forced to work from home over the past 12 months A leader would benefit from taking a considered approach to getting staff back to the office, and use the opportunity to redefine the way work is performed. Opportunities also exist to build culture, enhance relationships and deepen staff commitment by doing it right. In Australia, we have done an outstanding job of suppressing the Coronavirus, allowing us to contemplate shifting to a post-pandemic footing. One of the big questions that is challenging businesses and business leaders is that of getting the staff back to the office after mandatory work-from-home scenarios. What should a leader consider as they make this assessment for their business?  Should back to the office be simply a return to the past, or should something more valuable

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