Do they trust you? (part 1)

Do they trust you? (part 1)

3 years ago 0 0 809

A number of recent experiences remind me how important trust is in business – and how little it is really understood. In this two part series, we will take a look at what trust really means, what value and costs it has, how to build it, how it is lost – and what we can learn from these elements to better utilise trust in business. Consider some recent conversations I have had helping individuals, teams and organisations enhance their performance: • A sales team struggle to connect into a market where ‘companies like theirs’ have broken trust in the past. • A marketing manager is frustrated because he works for a CEO he just doesn’t ‘trust’. • A company wants to be seen as the ‘trusted partner’ in their industry, and believe this offers a competitive advantage. • A team faces performance issues and the trust established over a year

Read more

Creating Creativity – what you can do (part 2)

4 years ago 0 0 858

In part one of this series, we explored the elements of individuals and teams that limit creativity and innovation. In the second part of the series, we will explore what organisations can do about it.  By creating a culture of innovation, designing your thinking and taking true innovative leadership in your organisation, you can move beyond the things which impede creativity, and really create something special. Create the culture for innovation For innovation and design to be a reality in an organisation, it has to move from being a peripheral activity to a culturally accepted process, central to the business. This means the culture has to be accepting of the time and effort that creativity can take, and reward ‘exploration’ rather than outcomes. Peter Murphy, design instructor in Melbourne suggests that creativity is a difficult process, and to be truly innovative, they must “roll their sleeves up, say goodbye to

Read more

Creating creativity- overcoming the corporate blocks to innovation

4 years ago 0 0 1342

In a two part series, Phil Owens explores the concept of creativity in organisations.  In part one, Phil looks at what makes innovation and creativity difficult, and in part two proposes some new ways to approach creativity to make it a core part of your differentiation and success strategy. Creating creativity:  Part 1 – what gets in the way? Why do organisations struggle with creativity? How often do you attend meetings that have lofty ambitions to reach agreement, but simply fail?  How many ‘innovation’ or ‘creativity’ sessions have you been a part of, only to walk out with the same ideas that always seem to come up? Creativity is such a vital asset for business.  Peter Murphy, design instructor in Melbourne points out “Apple is a classic example – they put design at the centre of their business rather than the periphery.   As you build an organisational culture around creativity,

Read more

Empowered leadership through storytelling

4 years ago 0 0 1272

A core attribute of outstanding leadership is the ability to tell stories.  Stories are the human currency of social connection, and empower engagement, change and personal development, all which are key aspects of being a great leader. I remember once I was working in a highly technical field.  A bright young ‘up and comer’ returned from presenting to the executive board, looking deflated and dejected. ‘Not only did I not get the project approved’, he said, ‘ they nit picked every detail.’  I asked him to take me through the presentation- maybe I could help him? After the first minute or so it was clear that his 106 slides of data for a 20 minute presentation was probably not the way to go, so I gently stopped him, and said: “It reminds me of a time when I had to ask the executive board for 50 Million Euros capex in

Read more

Do you need to change how you change?

4 years ago 0 0 1226

 Are you, and those you lead, scared of the idea change? Do you recognise the need for change, but wonder how you can make your change program successful when so many other change programs, started with the best of intent, simply fail? Why is change so hard, and how can we ensure change programs succeed? Understanding the need to change: Change is inevitable.  Even with a highly successful organisation, change needs to happen as things around them evolve.  Things inside and outside the organisation change, and over time the requirement to change just to keep up, let alone ‘stay ahead’ gets bigger and bigger.  New technology, new processes, new customer requirements, new competitors, new regulations and even new social norms can rapidly turn today’s success into tomorrow’s obsolecence Because change is inevitable, we just need to decide if we will adapt to change, lead change, or become obsolete (there is

Read more

The 8 things which will create a perfect storm in your business

4 years ago 0 0 1616

So you have done the company survey, or listened by the coffee machine.  It seems like the jungle drums are beating, and the natives are restless.  The executive team gets together and asks themselves “How did we get like this?”, and wonder at the emerging signs that the culture and engagement strategies have failed. What organisations often find is that the company is not living its stated values, the staff are hardly engaged and the culture has devolved to something just more civil than a cage fight.  And you wondered where your performance had gone? Does this sound familiar?  Too often issues with engagement and culture are identified after these problems are having a real impact on the business and its results.  So many organisations find themselves in trouble and wonder both how they got there, and how to get themselves out. Unfortunately, many organisations find themselves in the perfect

Read more

Why I will never be an entrepreneur….

4 years ago 0 0 690

So many people who start businesses love to call themselves ‘entrepreneurs’.  I wonder if it is to make them sound like they have made it, or that they hang out with the cool kids? Reflecting on what I do at The Bigger Game, I realised that I am not an entrepreneur, and never will be. For me, being an entrepreneur is being focused on building a business, any business, to the point where someone else will buy it.  It’s about deciding ‘what can I sell’ and ‘how do I scale it’.  The success of entrepreneurialism is measured in what you have.  Not what you do. A florist who is passionate about flowers does not call themselves an entrepreneur, they call themselves a florist.  Regardless of how ‘much’ they have, it is their passion what what they do, rather than what they have, that makes the difference. Entrepreneurs have to be

Read more

Engaging four people for success

4 years ago 0 0 778

There are only four people in your business. Regardless of the type of business that you have, your business only contains four people. That’s right – only four. Well, it really contains only four TYPES of people: Leaders, Employees, Customers and Community. To be successful, a business has to engage each of these four types of people. The Leadership needs to be engaged with the purpose of the business, to make the critical decisions that take the business forward in a thoughtful and purposeful way.  Leaders who are engaged with WHY the business exists make purposeful decisions that drive the organisation to be better.  Leaders that are disengaged from the bigger purpose will make short term and self-centred decisions, which often leads the organisation into problems (even crisis). The employees need to be engaged to drive high performance.  The literature is clear that an engaged workforce increases performance above and

Read more