Avoid your ’emotional tipping point’
Avoid your 'emotional tipping point'

Avoid your ’emotional tipping point’

1 month ago 0 0 72

Summary: We all have ’emotional tipping points’ where we shift from a specific issue to having a globalised ‘problem’. Everyone’s tipping point and how they get there is entirely unique. There is a lot we can do to improve our lives by managing our ‘tipping points’ and how we allow things to build up to them. Emotional tipping points: How do you determine how much time you have to spend worrying about things that haven’t happened before you allow yourself to tip over into anxiety? How many times or how strongly must your borders be crossed before you kick off a full blown bout of anger or rage? How many times do you have to feel sad before you allow yourself to tip over into calling yourself depressed? If we want to break the cycle of emotions leading to powerful and unhelpful feelings and labels beyond the tipping point there

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Plan to fail - don't fail to plan

Plan to fail – don’t fail to plan

2 months ago 0 0 47

“Plans are worthless, but planning is everything” (D Eisenhower). Planning is such a critical part of success – but plans are not.  How many times are plans made and simply forgotten?  How many times do people and organisations spend massive time and effort generating a ‘plan’ only for it to be completely out of date before the ink is dry? We are living through such a reality now – As we go through the uncertainties of COVID, organisations and individuals are describing how they have had to ‘pivot’ and ‘adapt’ – meaning that whatever that they had planned to do has been made obsolete.  If plans are worthless, why should we plan? Lesson 1: The future is uncertain “No plan survives the first engagement with the opposition main force” (Helmuth von Moltke, 1871). We cannot forecast the future with any certainty.  We cannot know – or control – what is

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Decision making: the games we play

Decision making: the games we play

2 months ago 0 0 31

This post is part of the series on decision making.  Building on the research around the factors of decision making open to influence, we explore 3 common decision scenarios (games as defined by Nash) and how you can improve your personal decision making. Scenarios for decisions: Consider the following situations: You win at the casino, and believe you have discovered a ‘method’ for winning every time you play. A relative passes away, and there is disagreement over the division of the estate, and the relationships are permanently damaged. You have a rival who would rather harm your chances more than get any benefit, as long as they do better than you they are happy to wear some pain, too. You are in a negotiation and you the other side is asking for and expecting impossible things from you, ensuring the negotiation goes nowhere even though the path seems obvious to

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Deciding to be a better decision maker

6 months ago 0 0 219

  Summary: Make better decisions by understanding them. What makes a good decision?  When is effortful decision making warranted? Know the problems in decision making that emerge from assumptions and predictions When you have an important or novel decision to make, employ these simple tips to make better decisions.   Are you struggling to make a good decision? Do you have trouble committing to a decision, or selecting from a range of options? You are not alone – Decision making is something we do in every context of our lives, with the potential for life-changing outcomes. Yet what do we really know about how and why we make decisions, and how can we make them more efficiently and effectively? What are the features of a high-quality decision? A decision is about making a choice following some consideration – that is, evaluating and choosing what to do then acting accordingly. Any

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Back to office or back to the future?

7 months ago 0 0 328

Summary: Return to workplace scenarios following COVID are loaded with challenges. Staff have new expectations, experiences and capabilities after being forced to work from home over the past 12 months A leader would benefit from taking a considered approach to getting staff back to the office, and use the opportunity to redefine the way work is performed. Opportunities also exist to build culture, enhance relationships and deepen staff commitment by doing it right. In Australia, we have done an outstanding job of suppressing the Coronavirus, allowing us to contemplate shifting to a post-pandemic footing. One of the big questions that is challenging businesses and business leaders is that of getting the staff back to the office after mandatory work-from-home scenarios. What should a leader consider as they make this assessment for their business?  Should back to the office be simply a return to the past, or should something more valuable

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Are you insane in your approach to success?

8 months ago 0 0 376

I once sat in a training seminar where they ‘challenged’ the group with a (pretend) statistic: “Less than 10 percent of you will implement this fully, and less than 5% will be successful”.  They were obviously trying some reverse motivation – but without realising it, they were clearly identifying the biggest issue with what they were doing.  They were asking their ‘students’ to be insane in their approach to success. The definition of insanity: Einstein has been credited with saying ‘The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result”. How does this apply to people and organisations trying to generate sustained success? The answer is simple: you are insane if you think doing what someone else has done will make you successful. It doesn’t seem to make sense – it is insane to do keep doing the same things and expect different

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The simple success formula

8 months ago 0 0 282

In business, we are often looking for the perfect answer to our problems.  The answer to our complex problem should be ‘simple’ – but is it really? The idea of a simple answer to uncertainty and complexity drives so much of the coaching and consulting industries, because: People want simple answers to complex problems People buy certainty to escape uncertainty, and simple appears more certain than complex. A critical question arises, however: If the answer was simple, wouldn’t you have already discovered it and implemented it? When we consider the nature of business, it is impossible to think of every business as the same.  Each business has unique attributes and histories, including cultures, strategies and purposes.  There are different capabilities, skills and processes. There are different capacities to operate and to adapt. So how do we help such businesses? We can look at ‘models’ – frameworks that generally apply to

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