Understanding the ‘Trumpnado’ – the social psychology of Donald Trump

2 years ago 1 0 956

After it started as seemingly a bit of a joke, Donald Trump has catapulted into front-runner status for the Republican nomination for President in the United States. His extreme actions and language are completely at odds with the traditional political playbook. However, it seems to be working. Whilst it may seem completely illogical, there are compelling social psychology reasons why his approach is working – and there is a dangerous historical precedent. Where did the supporters come from? Donald Trump has drawn a large and passionate supporter base. Whilst Ted Cruz and Mark Rubio have fashioned messages to speak to a conservative mindset, Trump has spoken across classic voter categories. His supporter base was probably not even aware that they were Trump supporters, but his campaign has activated them. First to get on board were more extreme elements, but over time his activation has reached deeper and deeper into the

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Analytics: Big data, bad behaviour?

3 years ago 0 0 662

We exist in a world where ‘big data’ drives many decisions about what happens to us, what we are offered, and how we interact. The process of advanced business analytics is welcomed by some, who enjoy everything from customised medicine through to seamless online experiences, whilst others are afraid of what people know about them, and what they can do with this knowledge. Does ‘big data’ mean ‘bad behaviour’? So what is all the fuss about? What are people scared of with data analytics – and should they be? If companies have access to all of our data, does that mean that they can do things which we would consider unacceptable breaches of our privacy or individual identity, or make bad decisions – that is, demonstrate ‘bad behaviour’? What is ‘big data’ anyway? Data analytics is seen in business as a massive driver of competitive advantage. The more you know

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7 ways you are screwing up performance reviews (and what o do about it)

3 years ago 0 0 851

I get calls at this time of year from leaders in organisations who have left the mid-year assessment to the last minute (or their managers have). Regardless of which side of the review they are on, they all say something like: “Phil, I hate these things. They are such a waste of time. They just do more harm than good”. They seek help to make the performance appraisal process more palatable for them, and more valuable for the organisation. It raises an important question- should organisations do away with performance appraisal processes? My simple answer is an emphatic NO. Performance reviews are critical on a number of levels, and simply because people perform them poorly is not a signal to ditch them, but rather a signal to somehow do them differently. Why are they critical? Performance reviews are important for individuals and for organisations. They provide the link for learning

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Giving feedback to enhance performance

3 years ago 0 0 853

There is a lot of commentary about the value of formalised performance reviews. Unsurprisingly, when only 37% of employees in a major survey reported that they had never received valuable feedback from their employer or manager, the majority of comment seems to suggest that feedback processes are a waste of time. Feedback is imperative to enhancing performance, however giving and receiving feedback is fraught with problems, often institutionalised in such workplace processes. Understanding the true nature of feedback, and how to use it successfully to enhance performance is a critical leadership skill. Feedback on our performance comes in many forms – from what we see happening as an outcome of what we do, how we personally feel about what we do, and what other people observe, interpret and communicate to us. Feedback is important for developing performance at an individual, team and organisational level. Without feedback, we would perform a

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Forecasting excellence – without the crystal ball

3 years ago 0 0 699

I have been working with more than 30 business leaders from around Europe, the Middle East and Africa at a meeting in Barcelona. Our aim was to tackle some of the ‘big issues’ in strategy, marketing and sales, so that they could take back practical and powerful tools to their organisations. When we asked them what they wanted (or more specifically: “What could you take away from this meeting that would have a significant impact on your business”), one answer shone through strongly – most of them wanted to help their key personnel within their organisations to forecast better. I therefore created a hands-on workshop session for the attendees which focused on this topic. It reminded me that, amongst all of the important business skills that leaders and managers are taught, forecasting is often one which often gets less time, effort and attention than other topics. Following a practical case

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Neuropsychology of a killing

3 years ago 0 0 704

In the United States a man stood on a street corner, breaking the law.  He was selling cigarettes. He had a large physical stature.  And he was African American. The police arrived, and shortly thereafter Mr Garner, the father of 6, was dead. Mr Garner did not pull a gun. He did not attack with a knife.  Yet, he was killed. After the events in Ferguson, the tragedy of this circumstance is magnified. Leaving aside a series of very important issues (race, inequality, justice in society, etc, etc), there are some critical issues that need to be discussed. For example, what must be happening for police officers so that killing this person was the best, or only, option?  Why is 30 times more dangerous to be a person of colour approached by an Anglo-descendant police officer than if you are white? Regardless of claims of inherent ‘racist’ attitudes on behalf

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Introducing new marketing planning – a case review

4 years ago 0 0 707

Sometimes we have no choice other than to step up to our ‘bigger games’. In this case  an organisation was asked at short notice to shift from local marketing planning process to a new, globally mandated process.  The tension of completing a new process, with different templates, structures, languages and timelines created disbelief and even fear within the team.  This was ‘not possible’, a ‘waste of time’ and ‘just a template filling exercise’ in the views of key team members. As the case describes, the first step was to evaluate the current situation in line with the desired goals and to build a meaningful and actionable strategy to get there. The evaluation clearly identified the gaps in skills, marketing planning structures, language, timing and expectations.  It identified at deeper levels cultural, engagement, motivation and cognitive skill issues within the local team that impacted the ability to achieve what was required

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Melbourne’s Chief Resilience Officer: A big step and big challenges

4 years ago 0 0 1816

We can build resilience at a personal level, in teams, organisations and communities.  I applaud the City of Melbourne for seeing the importance of resilience, and implementing the role of ‘Chief Resilience Officer’, supported as part of the 100 Resilient Cities Project of the Rockerfeller Foundation. I therefore read with interest the article in the Age (http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/four-big-problems-for-melbournes-478088-chief-resilience-officer-20140730-zyf3p.html) talking about the challenges that Melbourne’s incoming ‘Chief Resilience Officer’ will face. In fact, the challenges are at least three times bigger than what is mentioned in the article. Firstly, the article really only covers preparation and management of crisis scenarios that impact upon the city.  Of course, the role of the Chief Resilience officer must encourage proper planning and preparation for crisis and stress events, but this is just the start. For Melbourne as a city, as a community, and a network of businesses and organisations, the new Chief Resilience Officer will

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Is your ‘Little Black Duck’ getting you in trouble?

5 years ago 0 0 811

I recently ran a one-day workshop on negotiation.  This was an experienced group of sales managers, each with lots of experience in negotiating big deals, and all with previous negotiation experience.  Even the best of them was being sabotaged in their negotiations by their ‘little black duck‘. Whilst they could all describe the core skills and elements of negotiation (what a BATNA is, for example), within the first two exercises it was clear that it wasn’t only what they knew, but rather which ‘part of them’ was negotiating.  For many of them, their ‘little black duck’ was getting them into trouble. In one exercise, participants were giving away 30% of their value, turning the negotiation into a battle or even accepting things which were not in their interests – because they were allowing their self-concept (identity issues) and emotions to drive their behaviours, rather than their considered interests and the issues

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